The Unfinished Revolution

In the past 20 years Mexico has taken a great step forward in dispelling the old economic and political patterns that frustrated her natural growth

1962

BILLING

THE UNFINISHED REVOLUTION
the emergence of mexico

narrator: joseph julian

research by annette nancarrow and boris holtzman

cameraman: carlos carbajal

film editor: manfred kirchheimer

producer-director:
michael alexander

executive producer and writer:
michael sklar

IN BRIEF

In the past 20 years Mexico has taken a great step forward in dispelling the old economic and political patterns that frustrated her natural growth. With a stable government and a people eager to improve their lot, the nation has moved rapidly into the industrial, technical and scientific age of the second half of the 20th century. A new agriculture and a new industry have emerged and with them a new working class, a new middle class and a new class of professionals, scientists, managers and technicians. Life has changed drastically at every level of Mexican society.

Problems remain: problems of growth and problems inherited from Mexico’s stormy past, as well as those of climate, geography, and the steadfast spectre of Communism. The Unfinished Revolution deals with the meeting of these problems of the strides that have been made and of the future plans of a nation with the most remarkable record of recent growth and accomplishment in Latin America.

AN INTERTEL PRODUCTION ◦ TIME SLOT 55 MINUTES

Available through

Global Television Services Ltd.,

3 Vere Street, London, W.1.

Phone: MAYfair 1167

Cables: Helpful, London

THE BACKGROUND

No longer revolting against economic feudalism and political dictatorship, Mexico is undergoing a rapid surge forward in every phase of national activity: economics, politics, agriculture, industry, education, health and housing.

A one-hour documentary examines this remarkable growth and terms it “The Unfinished Revolution.”

Mexico, in the past 20 years, has taken a great step forward in dispelling the old economic and political patterns that frustrated her natural growth. With a stable government and a people eager to improve their lot, the nation has moved rapidly into the industrial, technical and scientific age of the second half of the 20th century. A new agriculture and a new industry have emerged and with them a new working class, a new middle class and a new class of professionals, scientists, managers and technicians. Life has changed drastically at every level of Mexican society.

Problems remain: problems of growth and problems inherited from Mexico’s stormy past, as well as those of climate, geography, and the steadfast spectre of Communism. “The Unfinished Revolution” deals with the meeting of these problems, of the strides that have been made and of the future plans of a nation with the most remarkable record of recent growth and accomplishment in Latin America.

Michael Sklar, executive producer and writer of the programme states: “We look at housing by examining a new project for industrial workers developed by the Mexican Social Security Institute. Industrial growth is explored through films of a major steel plant in which interviews with management and government personnel bring out the new status of the Mexican businessman, as well as the government’s role in the development and stabilization of industry. The burgeoning new middle class way of life is illustrated by a visit to a completely modern home well-stocked with the latest appliances. Religion and recreation in the new Mexico are examined through scenes at the Cathedral of Cuernevaca and the resort at the Casino de la Selva. Finally, we see one of the most eloquent proofs of Mexico’s peaceful revolution, University City, the national university bursting with a student body of 70,000.”

“The Unfinished Revolution” portrays a vivid picture of Mexico’s strides toward a better world for her citizens by revealing some of the frustrations and unrealized objectives, as well as the remarkable achievements.

Progress with a soft drink advertisement in the background and the traditional dress of the riders reaching from the past into the present.

Freedom, equality, a hope for the future — these were the promises made to the people of Mexico 50 years ago. During the last two decades Mexico has indeed taken a great step forward in dispelling the old economic and political patterns that frustrated her natural growth, but many thousands of Mexicans still live in poverty, in squalid shanty towns where the jewels of life — an old bottle, an empty can, a log of wood — are searched for on garbage dumps. Many recent achievements are impressive. A new agriculture and a new industry have emerged, there are fine new universities, clinics and schools — but will Mexico be able to complete her ambitious growth before the underprivileged and discontented minority lose patience?

Writer and executive producer of “The Unfinished Revolution”, a 60-minute documentary, is Michael Sklar. He says “Because the panorama of Mexico is so vast, our film concentrates on the visible effects of this ‘unfinished revolution’ in a few varied areas. It portrays a picture of Mexico’s strides towards a better world for her citizens by revealing some of the frustrations and unrealised objectives, as well as the remarkable achievements.”

The sub-standard living of families like this has still to be alleviated.

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